The Futuristic World: There Are Two Options Left For Us, As Far As I Can Tell

Date: February 21th, 2017

The Futuristic World: The world of the future will be a complex one, regardless of whether you are an optimist or a pessimist. Technology – a big pixelated hand of man created to do what man wants, evolving before our very eyes – and nature – the elements of the universe, or multiverse, the never-blank slate we were born into and have been toying with ever since, the illusion of a God, the methodology of being born to run and made to work – must find a perfect equilibrium for Homo sapiens (and the other species born on Earth, as they are no less important) to survive. We must help that process.    

According to http://ridesharechoices.scripts.mit.edu, “carpooling first became prominent in the United States as a rationing tactic during World War II. It returned in the mid-1970s due to the 1973 oil crisis and the 1979 energy crisis. At that time the first employee vanpools were organized at Chrysler and 3M.” (Exact phrasing of the information presented taken from the Wikipedia page “Carpool.”)

Carpool lanes, as a concept, were accepted world-wide for two reasons.

1. Everybody hates traffic.

2. To cut carbon emissions.

The latter is kind of a big deal, because everyone has carpool lanes in their cities, even in the South of the United States.

Carpool lanes do help cut carbon emissions, not by much, but it’s the little things that count, and we’ve packaged them as something that everybody can enjoy, even those who don’t believe global warming is a real problem! Everybody hates traffic. Emphasis on everybody. The pill in the peanut butter is a tactic my mom uses to feed my dog her medicine. My dog needs the medicine, but she sure as hell doesn’t like it. This is how we fix the world. Think about Republicans, conservatives – people who stereotypically deny the truth. (This isn’t a behavior all Republicans have in common.) Democrats and liberals do it too, except it is more insidious, because they’re supposed to be “correct.” Ask an average Southerner if they’re willing to do anything about global warming, racism, or gun control, and you are sure to get a “Expletive no, you expletive expletive.” People like this are so stuck in their ways that the only way to get them to help – and with the bigger problems, we need everybody working to solve them – is to trick them.

We are in dire need of solutions.

The Doomsday Clock is a scientifically accepted method for predicting when the world will end.

This is the timeline: Doomsday Clock Timeline.

Yep – two minutes (two and a half minutes, actually) left. (It would do you some good to research this “clock” extensively, it’s very educational, and surprisingly hopeful, in the sense that they believe taking action would help at all.) The factors the clock counts include nuclear weaponry, climate change, and bio-security. “Two minutes” left on this clock isn’t literally 120 seconds, but it’s still plenty worrisome, as it was 17 minutes to midnight in only 1995 – this clock doesn’t necessarily rely on time. Instead, it calculates risk. The closer to midnight, the bigger chance of disaster striking at any moment. (See the Doomsday Dashboard for the main information the clock uses for its calculations.) The clock isn’t always accurate, but almost nothing is, and this is one of the most reliable sources in the world, created by top scientists, some of whom worked on the Manhattan project.

This clock shouldn’t paralyze you with fear.

It is the inaction of being paralyzed, by any feeling – fear, sadness, rage, embarrassment – that is the true danger. If these problems deter you emotionally, you should work even harder to solve them, rather than retiring into nonintervention.

We’ve got two main options left, if we want to re-wind the clock:

1. A “City Of Ember” (written by Jeanne DuPrau) thing. Move underground. Destroy the aboveground power plants, dams, and cities, and leave the Earth to the animals, plants, and weather patterns for at least 200 years. Come back out when the time is right, and begin again.

2. A massive change to the way people think. Less procrastination. Less complacency. More thinking, more doing. Kindness and intelligence being priorities. Weird ideas – attaching microbes to fish teeth so fish can eat materials found in trash, maglev trains, apps meant to maximize philosophical thinking – that are so “far out” they just might work.

REWIND THE CLOCK.

Mars (The 6-Part Series By Nat Geo) Is The Best Thing Ever

Date: February 2nd, 2017 

I have been fascinated by Mars for a few years now. This blog was about Mars for a while. (This blog went through many phases, which is why the domain name has nothing to do with…anything.)

Mars is so fascinating to me because in many ways it’s just like Earth, but without any protection available. Same type of rocky ground. There are even weirdly similar landforms (I say weird because when you think of it the universe is a giant crap game, we’re lucky, but it’s kind of strange), like plateaus, canyons and mountains. With the right equipment and a good sense of time, you could go hiking – as a purely recreational activity. There’s enough gravity that you don’t fly off. In some places on Earth, you can look outside your window and go, “Hey, look. It’s Mars with a blue sky and some clouds.” But on Mars, your body is so tiny and so frail. The only thing keeping you alive is something purely external – your spacesuit, the walls of your home base. It doesn’t matter that “your lungs are still working, or would be, if not for…” You don’t matter on Mars. Throughout the Mars series, they repeat the metaphor that Mars is actively trying to fight them. That’s not how I see it. Mars just doesn’t care about you, your friends, your family, your old life; the elementary school you went to, your favorite color. Earth is a living, breathing organism. Not in the technical sense, no, but you have to admit something’s up – on Earth, everything…works. The systems in place never stop functioning – or at least they never used to, but we’ll see where global warming takes us – every single thing on the Earth is for itself and everything else. Mars, on the other hand, is apathetically failing. I am drawn to that type of planet, and the people willing to go and live on it.

Mars the series is quite the opposite of “apathetically failing.” It is sympathetically succeeding. Sympathetic in that you cheer when the characters – and real people, on the other side of the series – do, and the surreal, fast-heartbeat feeling hits all of you as they step on to that rocket for the first time. Successful in that Mars caught the attention of all the big news sources (think Forbes, WIRED, Variety, The New York Times) including this article from screenertv.com, titled “Is Nat Geo the next HBO?” (Click title for link to article.)

Mars is cool. One of the main reasons is that JiHAE is really, really cool. (Kidding, favoritism isn’t my thing.) The cast fits so well.

JiHAE is so good at portraying someone who wasn’t really supposed to be the leader, but had to step up. You felt the difficulty in every decision, and you felt her humanity. I’m describing both sisters. Joon and Hana Seung were both dreamers who grew into almost bitter pragmatists, and you have to respect their journey.

Ben Cotton is amazing as Ben Sawyer. I wanted to give him a big hug as he was dying. He cared so much about the others, and even when he was in pain, he put them before himself. He sorta reminds me of me. Or the Tenth Doctor (Doctor Who).

Alberto Ammann is, as they say in the fandoms, “my smol son.” I absolutely loved the “lavender moment.” And I like how pissed Javier gets at the smallest of things. It makes me laugh.

Clémentine Poidatz is wonderful, as the other half of Javier, and a beautiful (inside and out), intelligent woman herself. She’s good at what she does, so much so that she would be the one I’d trust to take care of me in space.

And Anamaria Marinca is so adorable. She reminds me of Felicia Day (seen on Supernatural as the the Queen, Charlie Bradbury). If Marta Kamen were real, she’d be my new best friend, and we would go out for ice cream and chat about science and our favorite TV shows.

Sammi Rotibi’s Robert has the bromanciest of bromances with Javier, and without him, the team just wouldn’t be the same. He is “the rock” and “the leaf.”

What I like about the cast is: not only is the cast “good,” the cast is realistic. Different colors, races, nose shapes, eyelids, smiles, personalities…they all compliment each other in the way real people do, and they’re all so dynamic – the cast of Mars is a great hypothetical stand-in for the waves of actual astronauts responsible for colonizing Mars in the future.

Here are some of my favorite moments from Mars:

1. Ben Sawyer, Dying And Dead (And Alive!)

Ben Sawyer is my new “character crush” (as opposed to celebrity crush), as is evident from my various pet names and exclamations during the duration of the first two episodes (“Nooooo honey no!” “My precious baby nooooooo!” “Aww, baby!” “NO BEN NOOOOOO!”). At first, he appears authoritative in the bad way, as though he will judge your every move. Then it is revealed that he is just as charming, cheerfully optimistic, and frankly…”cute” as the rest of them. Not only that, but he loves his crew, he loves his crew from the bottom of his heart and he hates to put them at more risk than they’re already at. He gives the regular speech about it (“you could die, yada yada yada”), but then makes it clear that he cares about his crew more than anything else, and that to me is so, so sweet…I love him. He sat and contained his pain for hours, helping them get to – relative – safety. And – yes – he is so handsome…I love him so much.

2. The Lavender Moment

Javier and Amelie are so cute together. Amelie helps the hilariously, constantly pissed Javier calm down. Javier is a good mechanic (is that what you would call what he does?), and he has a heart of gold inside of him. Lavender is now my favorite word in the entire universe. (That’s a slight exaggeration.) Lavender lavender lavender. Awww…

3. Paul Goes Bonkers

First of all, do not hire someone who talks to his plants.

This scene is trippy, and surreal, and heart-wrenching, and kinda awful – and I love it. It’s an example of what I was talking about earlier – you are not the special snowflake you were on Earth, and you can get killed via the wrong door being opened. John Light (Paul) is so innocent in his portrayal of Paul (Paultrayal, for those of you with an interest in portmanteaus) that you just can’t blame him, not really, but it’s always in the back of your mind that they shouldn’t have brought him along.